Construction Contracts: Mediation Is A Great Alternative To Litigation

On September 25, 2013 by

Mediation bigstock-Attorney-at-Law-sitting-at-des-49285283 copyMediation and Construction Law are two of my favorite topics to discuss. These are my favorite aspects of the practice of law. Every construction law dispute I encounter starts with the premise of getting contractors paid. No matter the dispute, the underlying factor is withholding of money along the hierarchical chain of characters.

Owners need to get cash from the lenders. General Contractors need to get progress payments from the Owner. Subs are always waiting on the GC to pay out. Suppliers provide goods on credit with the hopes of getting paid once the other parties take their share. There are small margins for error and high possibility of dispute.

With such small percentage of money actually going to profits its no wonder owners, general contractors, subcontractors and suppliers cannot afford expensive litigation. There are efficient and cost effective means to settle disputes without having to tee it up in the courts, Mediation and Arbitration. For the purposes of this blog, I will be speaking to the more flexible of the two forms of alternative dispute resolution methods, Mediation.

Do Construction Contracts Contain Mediation Clauses?

It depends on the contract. Many American Institute of Architects (AIA) form contracts will allow for an option to include both a mediation and arbitration clause for alternative dispute resolution. If you are unsure if your contract has  mediation clause you should look to see if there is some type of language like the following provided by the American Arbitration Association (AAA), who is the leader in the arbitration and mediation space.

If a dispute arises out of or relates to this contract, or the breach thereof, and if the dispute cannot be settled through negotiation, the parties agree first to try in good faith to settle the dispute by mediation administered by the American Arbitration Association under its Construction Industry Mediation Procedures before resorting to arbitration, litigation, or some other dispute resolution procedure.” AAA Construction Industry Arbitration Rules and Mediation Procedures (pg 14).

There are many variations on this type of clause. Courts are very keen on upholding mediation clause language because courts favor resolving disputes through other means.

Construction Disputes Settle With Mediation

Some disputes will never settle. The parties are so entrenched to a position that they become irrational and will not compromise. The construction industry is different. Contractors tend to want to continue doing business and therefore do not want to burn bridges.

I have personally been witness to numerous construction disputes setting through mediation. The parties agree to meet with a neutral third party, the mediator, and go through the process until a compromise is reached. Conventional wisdom states that the best settlements are those where both sides leave unhappy.

Construction disputes are no different. Each party negotiates some give and take until a compromise is reached. I see it all the time. Have your attorney put mediation clauses in your company’s contracts. Do not sign contracts unless they have a mediation clause. Finally, even if there is not a specific clause mandating mediation, you can still mediate! All that is required are two parties who want to solve a dispute.

 

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On Sep 25, 2013

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  • Great thoughts Seth. I almost always recommend mediation to my clients. I do so even more now that I’m a mediator myself. However, mediation needs to be voluntary and not forced by contract. If it is “Required” then most parties (in my experience) just go through the motions to “check the box.”