In The Pipeline – Changes in Louisiana Construction Law

On May 14, 2013 by

Louisiana State Capitol, Baton Rouge
Louisiana State Capitol, Baton Rouge (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If there is any one constant in the legal profession, it is that the law is an ever-evolving, dynamic thing. While there are some general principles that tend to not change all that drastically over the years, the devil truly is in the details. Having to keep abreast of these changes is why you’ll hear people refer to the “practice” of law – we attorneys must continue to learn and adapt as we continue through our careers. Here at Wolfe Law Group, we make sure to have our ears to the ground in order to provide the most up-to-date information for our clients and their businesses. This legislative session, there are several proposed changes in Louisiana construction law, all of which may critically impact how contractors do business in this state. This post is the first of two parts discussing those changes.

 Proposed Changes to the Private Works Act

There are currently three bills in various stages of the legislative process that would significantly change how different parties secure their rights to payment. The first, Senate Bill 183, is the furthest along of the three, having successfully passed through the Senate and out of the House Committee on Civil Law and Procedure. It is the only bill this session, and the first bill since 1999, that seeks to amend La. R.S. 9:4802. This statute outlines which parties are entitled to assert claims for payment against an owner and a contractor. Should this bill become law (which is likely given the total lack of opposition in the Senate or in the House Committee), lessors of movables would be required to provide formal notice to contractors and owners within 10 days of their materials being used on a project, as opposed to simple delivery of a lease. This change might sound insignificant, but it is because of that very reason why it is important for us to keep our clients informed. Without paying proper attention to how the law evolves, current or potential clients might lose their ability to secure payment because they were unaware of this formalizing shift in the law.

The other two bills, House Bill 190 and House Bill 362, propose changes to La. R.S. 9:4822. This statute is arguably the most important in the Private Works Act because it outlines and defines the time and notice requirements that must be met in order for parties to secure their right to make a claim to secure payment. House Bill 190 has passed through the House and awaits a vote in the Senate Committee on the Judiciary. This bill proposes the least significant of changes, merely stating clearly that statements of claim and privilege need not have attached copies of unpaid invoices unless the statement specifically states they are attached. House Bill 362, however, would extend the time requirements for parties to file their claims by double. When notices of contract have been properly filed and you are one of the parties entitled to a privilege by La. R.S. 9:4802, you would have sixty (60) days to file your claim after the notice of termination, as opposed to the current thirty (30) day window. If you are a contractor that properly filed your notice of contract (if necessary), you would have one hundred twenty (120) days to file your claim following termination or substantial completion, instead of the current sixty (60) day window. These deadlines are extended throughout the statute: all 30 day limits are changed to 60 days, and all 60 days are changed to 120 days. The success of this bill has yet to be seen: unlike the others, it hasn’t even made it out of committee yet, and the session is fast coming to a close.

An Easing of Home Improvement Contracting Registration

Securing and maintaining the proper licensing and registration is incredibly important in the construction world here in Louisiana. The knowledge and expertise required in performing such work or providing these services is why it is always recommended that people seek out professional assistance, especially for work around the home. Surprisingly, and not necessarily wisely, Senate Bill 81 proposes to modify the status quo in relaxing registration requirement for home improvement contracting. Currently, no person shall undertake or perform or agree to perform home improvement contracting services unless they are registered with the Residential Building Contractors Subcommittee of the State Licensing Board for Contractors as a home improvement contractor. The proposed law (which unanimously passed the Senate and is scheduled for floor debate in the House on May 16th), adds the following exception to La. R.S. 37:2175.2:

No individual shall undertake on his own property self-performed home improvement contracting services having a value in excess of seven thousand five hundred dollars unless registered with and approved by the Residential Building Contractors Subcommittee of the State Licensing Board for Contractors as a home improvement contractor.

Basically, the legislature is trying to make it easier for a homeowner to perform certain work on his or her property without having to go through the necessary registration channels. While this might not be an issue for some, it is worrying that something as particularized as home construction may be continuing down a path of non-regulation. The true extent of this relaxation, of course, will remain to be seen.

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On May 14, 2013

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